Capture Their Attention: 5 Elements of a Good Children’s Book

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What makes a good children’s book is not the fancy cover or the quirky, irresistible pink unicorn. A children’s book is considered good when it, somehow, is able to stay with the kids who read it. Of course, this kind of impression cannot be achieved with illustrations or character development alone.

If your aim is to touch children’s lives through the printed word, these elements of a good children’s book will help you realize that goal.

Pre-Recognized Age Group

Pre-Recognized Age Group

When it comes to children’s early development, parents always need confirmation whether the information or content presented is appropriate for their children’s age. Defining your children’s book’s audience beforehand gives parents the assurance that what their buying is something that can contribute to the proper development of their children. Most educators classify children’s age groups as the following: babies (0 2), toddlers (2 3), early school (4 8), and middle childhood (6 12). You can build your story and worlds better when you already have an idea who your creations are for.

Memorable Characters

Memorable Characters

Characterization is one of the major elements of a good children’s book. It’s not enough to make the characters pretty. They need to have a strong appeal too—one that resonates with young readers. Their appeal may center on their values and traits. It might be hinged on their outrageous but amusing imagination. It might even be on their curiosity or innocent sense of adventure. Whatever way you choose to present them, the best thing you can do for the characters of your children’s book is to set them as role models that can influence kids to become better individuals.

Illustrations and Vocabulary

Illustrations and Vocabulary

Children always learn from what they see, so an appealing set of illustrations can greatly add to your book’s value. As one of the elements of a good children’s book, illustrations partnered with good vocabulary is an effective combination. When used as teaching tools, this combo will help young readers bring objects together with the words that properly describe them.

Plot

Plot

Excellent characterization is good and all, but with an engaging plot to go with it, your children’s book will be ten times better. You can think of the endearing shenanigans that kids do every day and turn them into exciting adventures that will stimulate both their recognition patterns and imagination. Be as original as possible, and young readers will clearly hear your voice through your story.

Life Lessons

Life Lessons

Part of children’s stories charm is their simplicity. It brings childhood memories to adults, and understanding to young readers. Simple themes can be lighthearted stories for young readers—it can also teach children about life lessons, whether it be about friendship, courage, family, responsibility, or independence.

It might be a good idea to not seem too preachy with your tone when sending a message through your children’s book. Since you have to consider various family backgrounds and beliefs, send your message in a way that respects those differences.


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